Relationship with Other Drugs

Browse by letter: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z # Site: All Medical Info.com
Relationship with Other Drugs


 Page: Relationship with Other Drugs

  Main article

Home > Drug Addiction > Relationship with Other Drugs


Since its origin in the 1950s, the "gateway drug" hypothesis, has been one of the central pillars of marijuana drug policy in the United States, but this has model of cause and effect not been proven. Those who subscribe to this theory argue that cannabis use may lead one down the path of drug addiction, and should therefore be treated as a serious matter. Many researchers conclude that this model of behavior has little basis in fact, though others have found veracity in these claims. Despite the conflicting results of such studies, many researchers agree that the illegal status of cannabis has a direct connection to the "gateway theory". The reasoning goes that cannabis users are more likely than non-users to place themselves in situations where other illicit substances are being used. In order to acquire cannabis they are likely to become acquainted with people who use or sell other more stigmatized drugs such as cocaine or heroin, which may lead to serious addictions. Using this philosophy, activities such as smoking tobacco and drinking alcohol may also be regarded as having a gateway effect on youth. Indeed, certain studies have shown that tobacco smoking is a better predictor of concurrent illicit drug use than smoking cannabis. With this argument in mind, certain activist groups such as NORML contend that legalizing cannabis would substantially reduce the use of other drugs by taking the distribution of marijuana out of the hands of criminals, and regulating it in a similar manner to alcohol or tobacco. Government agencies such as the DEA, however, claim that legalization would do far more harm than good, and would likely cause a rise in cannabis use.

A study published in The Lancet 24 March 2007[39] finds that cannabis is both less harmful and less addictive than either alcohol or tobacco. Twenty drugs were assigned a risk from 0 to 3. Cannabis was ranked 17th out of 20 for harmfulness, while alcohol and tobacco were ranked 11th and 14th respectively. Cannabis was ranked 11th for dependence while alcohol was 6th and tobacco 3rd, behind heroin and cocaine, which were also the two rated most harmful behind gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), and in the same order.

Cannabis
Marijuana is one of the most commonly used illegal drugs. This article looks at the health risks related to cannabis use.

Drug Addiction - Cannabis...
Drug Addiction - Ancient History...
Drug Addiction - Religious and Spiritual Use...
Drug Addiction - Medical Use...
Drug Addiction - Relationship with Other Drugs...
Drug Addiction - New Breeding and Cultivation Techniques...
Drug Addiction - Preparations for Human Consumption...
Drug Addiction - Immediate Effects of Consumption...
Drug Addiction - Health Issues and the Effects of Cannabis...
Drug Addiction - Legality...



Home > Drug Addiction > Relationship with Other Drugs


 Important notice:
The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.
© AllMedicalInfo.com Links | Privacy Policy | Home